Power, Wisdom, Love

In my last blog we looked at how Joseph is an example of someone who learned the glory of the grind and recognized that God’s best is not always a happy and comfortable place to be.

No one concludes that their situation is God’s best in a vacuum. Behind Joseph’s recognition of God’s best was a belief in this God who provides the best.  If we are to learn the glory of the grind and recognize God’s best for us, we need to believe at least three things about this God who gives us what is best.

First, we need to believe that He is a God of power.  The Bible teaches that God is omnipotent, that is, he can do anything and everything that is consistent with his nature.  Since not everything has that consistency there are things the Bible says God cannot do. He cannot deny himself – He cannot wake up one day and decide he no longer wants to be God.  He cannot lie – He is, by very nature, truth.  So to have confidence in God’s best, we need to believe that He is a God of power able to accomplish all that concerns us.

Second, we need to believe that He is a God of wisdom.  He is omniscient, that is, He knows all things.  God not only knows the past, present and future completely and perfectly, He even knows all potentialities.  So to have confidence in God’s best, we need to believe that He is a God of wisdom, wise enough to know what is best for us.

Third, we need to believe that He is a God of love.  His love for His own is unconditional with the promise that He will never leave us or forsake us.  So to have confidence in God’s best, we need to believe that He is a God of everlasting love who desires the best for us.

When we doubt that our situations, relationships, etc. are not God’s best, we are expressing unbelief in one of these truths about God. We may believe that God is powerful enough to accomplish the best and wise enough to know what it is but doubt that He loves us enough to desire it for us.  Or we may believe that God is powerful enough to accomplish the best and loves us enough to desire it for us but doubt that He is wise enough to know what it is.  Or we may believe that God is wise enough to know the best and loving enough to desire it for us but just doesn’t have the power to pull it off. Though we would probably not express it in these terms, questioning God’s best demonstrates unbelief in one of these areas.

These three attributes of God – Power, Wisdom, Love – are like a three-legged stool.  When all the legs are in place I can sit confidently on the stool of God’s best.  When the stool starts to tilt, I know that my confidence in one of the legs is is waning.

The next time you feel yourself leaning towards wondering whether or not you have God’s best, it might be a good idea to look at the legs of your stool.  Is there one in which your confidence is waning?

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About Dr. John H. Harbison

Son of God, Husband, Father, Author of "Keeping Christ in Ministry,"Vice-President for Academic Affairs, College Pastor, Runner, Writer
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